State of Concept
Athens

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18 November—6:30 pm

Event

Greece: Borders and the Refugee crisis

18 November, 2019

With

Athena Athanasiou, Stefanos Levidis, Epaminondas Farmakis, Apostolos Fotiadis

Location

Tousa Mpotsari 19, 11741

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This discussion is the third and last in the framework of the exhibition of Forensic Architecture in Greece. Forensic Architecture are internationally known among other things for their extensive investigations into the refugee crisis, in particular NGOs rescuing at sea and their criminalisation by EU governments, such as their investigations into the Juventus and Seawatch cases. In Greece they are known for their investigations into the deaths of Paul Fyssas and Zackie Costopoulos.

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The present state of the migratory condition reflects the dark colonial past of Northern Europe, which for centuries has been the direct cause of the persecution and displacement of peoples who suffered and continue to suffer from the various forms of violence inflicted upon them. Today, many countries have closed their borders, convincing thousands of their citizens that their actions are legitimate methods of securing their territory and the nation-state. Other countries are finding alternatives: In 2019 Italian politician Matteo Salvini passed new legislation imposing fines on vessels trying to land refugees, with amounts up to one million euros. In Greece, refugees are housed in Lesvos, at the camp of Moria 15,000 in a 3,000-person facility. The last years we have witnessed accidental deaths due to fires or car accidents. Amnesty International and other organisations have publicly condemned Greece and are deeply concerned about the tragic conditions in which refugees live.

Those who are not fortunate enough to survive the journey are lost at sea. The distancing we face with the news of thousands of people drowning in the Mediterranean or starving in Yemen is similar to our indifference to extreme levels of poverty around the world.

The migratory / exile / refugee condition is the absolute place of violence today in Greece and internationally. It is not only governments but also the citizens that exercise violence towards The Other. The latest examples of racist statements and movements against immigrants and refugees, from the lips of politicians, or even in morning tv shows in Greek media, prove that unfortunately when there is no proper information and we refuse to acknowledge the inhumane conditions in which millions of people live today, stereotypes are created, that do not reflect at all what people are facing prior to the point of becoming refugees.

This discussion is the third and last in the framework of the exhibition of Forensic Architecture in Greece. Forensic Architecture are internationally known among other things for their extensive investigations into the refugee crisis, in particular NGOs rescuing at sea and their criminalisation by EU governments, such as their investigations into the Juventus and Seawatch cases. In Greece they are known for their investigations into the deaths of Paul Fyssas and Zackie Costopoulos.

Monday’s discussion will consist of small presentations and a discussion with: Athena Athanasiou, professor of Social Anthropology at Panteion University, Stefanos Levidis (Forensic Architecture), Epaminondas Farmakis (president of the NGO Human Rights 360) and Apostolos Fotiadis, journalist.

The conversation will be in Greek.

Program

18.30 Welcome iLiana Fokianaki

18.45 Athena Athanasiou

19.00 Epaminondas Farmakis

19.15 Stefanos Levidis

19.30 Apostolos Fotiadis

19.45 Round table discussion with the speakers and the public

Agenda

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Agenda

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Greece: Borders and the Refugee crisis

18 November, 2019